Blog

The NWT Literacy Council hears from community family literacy facilitators that they want more dads and male role models to come to their programs. We committed to create a resource or tip sheet to help get dads involved in family literacy. But the task seemed daunting to me, as I am not a man or a dad. How do I know what will support dads? So I recently jumped at the chance to go to a… Read more.
The keynote speaker at last week’s Indigenous Languages and Education Symposium urged her audience to help each other and work together to promote and revitalize Indigenous languages. Dr. Lorna Wanasts’a7 Williams, of the University of Victoria, said the Northwest Territories is privileged to still have so many Indigenous language speakers. While colonization, including education, was used to… Read more.
Are you like me? At conferences or workshops, I sometimes get overwhelmed with the amount of information that’s offered. There’s often too much for me to absorb and retain. Enter Sam Bradd. Sam is what’s known as a “graphic facilitator”. As people deliver complex ideas, he records what is being said graphically on a giant piece of paper. In recent years, graphic facilitation has become popular.… Read more.
The days are getting longer, and hopefully warmer as we head into my favourite month of the winter. I love March; the snow is so bright and beautiful; the light lasts into the evening and there are so many fun things happening all around the NWT. March also means a break for most kids, and a chance to add in some fun family activities. Check out these fun ideas to make the most of March! Join in… Read more.
Two weeks ago, I had the privilege of attending Aurora College’s professional development sessions on Teacher Leadership. Developmental studies instructors from the three college campuses and community adult educators from all NWT communities attended. It was a time to re-engage with old friends, meet new colleagues, and learn together. Often at northern meetings we bring in southern scholars… Read more.
For members of Gwıch’ın Nahtraahadaal Walk to Tuk is an opportunity for language learning and language revitalization. Gwıch’ın Nahtraahadaal means “Gwıch’ın Walking” in Dınjıı Zhu’ Gınjık (Gwıch’ın language). The NWTRPA started Walk to Tuk in 2010 to encourage NWT residents to stay active during the coldest, darkest months of the year. It’s amazing to witness how Walk to Tuk has become so much… Read more.
We will be hearing a lot about Indigenous languages this year, as the world marks the International Year of Indigenous Languages. Two language champions made the case for language-based education and health services during a webinar recently hosted by the National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health. In its Social Determinants of Health Fact Sheet, the Centre states that “revitalization… Read more.
This January 27 is the 20th Anniversary of National Family Literacy Day. What started in 1999 as an ABC Life Literacy Canada awareness day is now celebrated in communities across the country. NWT communities are no different. We love to see all the fun activities groups, schools, families and others use to mark this day. The NWT Literacy Council has hosted pyjama parties, puppet shows, family… Read more.
Who knew that student filmmaking could be a vehicle to harness, empower, and celebrate reading, writing, and technology? Lucky for us at Kaw Tay Whee School, we have keen, dedicated teachers who embrace student interest, and recognize the potential of moving projects such as this on to the next level! That next level was an entry into the popular Dead North Film Festival, followed by an entry… Read more.
While Walk to Tuk has already begun for some people, you can still register a team until January 14, at www.nwtrpa.org. NWT families, individuals, schools, and workplaces are encouraged to form teams. Walk to Tuk teams try to collectively walk a total of 1,658 km between January 2 and February 28. That’s the distance along the Mackenzie River from Fort Providence to Tuktoyaktuk. If walking isn’… Read more.